Employee Info for Reporting

Whenever one person stands up and says, “Wait a minute, this is wrong,” it helps other people do the same.

-Gloria Steinmen

Just need to share and get the story to the right people? File anonymously so our professionals can address the situation.

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If you have experienced or know someone that has experienced an incident but you are not sure about it – connect with someone that can help. Connect with Someone
Expectation of Responsible Employees
You are required to report any information you are aware of, whether it is from a student or employee sharing, or you become aware of a story through third person. Responsible employees are required to report incidents of gender-based discrimination or harassment, sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence, stalking, or retaliation to the Title IX Coordinator. Incidents can include but are not all inclusive to combinations of

  • employee to employee
  • employee to student
  • student to student
Choose to believe. It is an enormous step for someone to talk with another person about their story, and this person has placed trust in you by revealing the experience.

Do I tell students I am a responsible employee?
Yes! Please share with them your role as an employee of EOU. It is important to inform the student you are required to report any information the student reports to you. The following statement is suggested to have available to inform the student:

I need to tell you that I am considered a responsible employee. I must inform the University an incident has occurred. I don’t want to scare you, but your personal safety and overall health is our number one concern. The reason we do this report is to make sure you are able to get all the help and support you. If you do not want details of what occurred reported or are not interested in making a complaint at this time, you have the right to maintain your privacy. I will only report what you confide in me. If you need to work through the details of what has happened, let me connect you with our Privileged Campus Advocate, who is a confidential employee.

Who are confidential employees?

EOU has several resources to choose from for confidentiality. The following are contacts that victims can share their story with and is not reported without consent from the victim.

Choose to believe their story

Responding with compassion, validation, and support when an individual discloses that they may have been a victim of emotional, physical, sexual or gender-based harassment or misconduct, can be an important part of their healing process. Sometimes, the most valuable advice comes from someone that individual already trusts.

How to report an incident shared with a responsible employee

  • Report to the University: Submit a Title IX Anonymous Report Form
  • File a report in person with the Title IX Coordinator, a Deputy Coordinator or with Human Resources.
  • Refer victim to the Privileged Campus Advocate or another confidential resource.

Confidential Resources at EOU

You have options to report

  • Connect with a Privileged Campus Advocate, who is a confidential contact, to learn about options and services available. Campus Office at 541.962.3381
  • Title IX Coordinator File a report with the Title IX Coordinator and Director of Student Relations at 541.962.3476. What you report may have connections to a bigger picture that helps the University keep students and employees safe. Reporting stories that seem off and are welcome.
  • File an Anonymous Report. Unless you provide your name or the name of the alleged perpetrator, this information is used for the purpose of statistical reporting.

You have options to report

  • Connect with a Privileged Campus Advocate, who is a confidential contact, to learn about options and services available. Campus Office at 541.962.3381
  • Title IX Coordinator File a report with the Title IX Coordinator and Director of Student Relations at 541.962.3476. What you report may have connections to a bigger picture that helps the University keep students and employees safe. Reporting stories that seem off and are welcome.
  • File an Anonymous Report. Unless you provide your name or the name of the alleged perpetrator, this information is used for the purpose of statistical reporting.

The Bystander Effect

Also known as the Bystander Effect, Genovese Effect is named after an incident where a woman was murdered in the 1960′s, her neighbors heard her screaming but failed to react. This apathetic approach sparked much interest and controversy, asking the question if society had reached a new low. This same kind of phenomenon can also happen within organizations when stories or incidents are occurring and employees and team members look the other way for a variety of reasons. Reasons can include rationale such as the following:

  • Don’t want to get involved.
  • It isn’t that bad.
  • It does not involve me.
  • Somebody else will report it.

I am third person on a story
Having knowledge regarding another student or employee in this situation, you are expected as a Responsible Employee, to pass this information onto the Title IX Coordinator. It is important to provide support to a victim of sexual assault. Sometimes this person is ashamed by the incident and afraid of what may happen by reporting, such as retaliation. These steps are designed to help best support and assist with the person’s physical and emotional needs, while also protecting the EOU community.

I am not sure if this is a story to report
You do not have to determine IF you should report. The Title IX Coordinator is trained to hear your story and make an determination. The best thing to do is share the story so we can see if follow up is necessary.

We believe it is the right of the victim/survivor of interpersonal violence to decide if they wish to report an incident, and how much information they wish to share about the incident.

 

You get to choose – it is your story
Under federal law and University policy, EOU is required to investigate all reports of interpersonal violence: sexual harassment, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking that are brought to our attention. The extent of the investigation depends on the amount of information that is shared about the incident. You can also request changes to your academic, housing, transportation and working situations, at this time.

We believe it is the right of the victim of interpersonal violence to decide if they wish to report an incident, and how much information they wish to share about the incident.

Responsible Employees

Most faculty, staff and some students are required by University policy to report incidents of interpersonal violence of which they become aware. This first group is considered non-confidential and is categorized as a Responsible Employee. A University employee cannot guarantee complete confidentiality, but the individual can guarantee privacy. Information is disclosed only to select University personnel who have an essential need to know in order to carry out their University responsibilities. As is the case with any educational institution, the University must balance the needs of the individual student with its obligation to protect the safety and well-being of the community at large. Therefore, depending on the seriousness of the alleged incident, further action may be necessary, including a campus security alert. The alert, however, will never contain information identifying the student who brought the complaint.

Some staff are designated as Confidential Resources meaning they are not required under University policy or the law to divulge information about interpersonal violence. These employees are also referred to as Privileged contacts. Students who are uncertain about reporting their assault may find comfort in first meeting with a Confidential Resource to explore options available to them, and to receive information about campus and community supports.


Not quite sure what to do next?

If you are still unsure about reporting, connect with our Privileged Campus Advocate. Information you share with the Privileged Campus Advocate is not shared without your consent.

 

Statement on retaliation

EOU prohibits retaliation against individuals who engage in reporting a complaint of sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, dating or domestic violence, and/or stalking. Retaliatory behavior is regarded as additional misconduct and may lead to increased sanctions.