Eastern Oregon University > Center for Culturally Responsive Practices > Culturally Responsive Practices Workshop Series

Culturally Responsive Practices Workshop Series

Archived Events

May 3rd & 4th, 2019:

Dr. Francisco Rios and Dr. Kristen French

Rios and French Flyer 2019

Re/Imagining Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy: Leadership, Land, and the Pursuit of Educational Justice.

The Center for Culturally Responsive Practices at Eastern Oregon University is proud to host a presentation with guests Dr. Francisco Rios and Dr. Kristen French of Western Washington University.  Our guests will join us for a EOU faculty and staff development presentation from 1:30pm-3:00pm and a community keynote presentation at 6:30 p.m. both on May 3rd in Huber Auditorium (BH 102).  On May 4th, regional PK-12 teachers are invited to join us in the College of Education for a workshop designed just for them! The overarching visit topic is “Re/Imagining Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy: Leadership, Land, and the Pursuit of Educational Justice.”  A narrative for each session is provided below.  Please note that the community keynote event is free and open to the public and light refreshments will be served.  Please share this information with your students, friends, and other community members.  additionally, if you have any PK-12 teacher friends, please invite them to register for the free workshop on Saturday, May 4th.

Additionally, both events will be LiveStreamed via our CCRP page http://www.eou.edu/ccrp
Guest speakers Dr. Francisco Rios and Dr. Kristen French from Western Washington University will be presenting on the following topics:

EOU FACULTY AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT: 

Leaning In and Leading On for Diversity and Justice
This interactive session will focus on four key principles of leading for diversity as described by Shawn Harper.  Each of these ask us to lean in to often complicated and complex beliefs, knowledges, and ways of walking in the world in advance of leading forward for equity and justice. This key principles of race conscious leadership ask that we become keenly aware of the current moment, authentically engage in deep conversations and collaborations with the Other, accurately understand the experiences of diversity for people of color in our schools/campuses, and boldly confront bias and institutional structures that serve as barriers to equity and justice in education.

COMMUNITY KEYNOTE ADDRESS: (free and open to the public)

Toward Tribal Sovereignty and Indigenous Futurities in Multicultural Education through Land/Water/Place/Space

Within higher education and multicultural education, land/territory acknowledgements have become commonplace as a way to recognize the First Peoples and land when hosting meetings or events. What is less common is a deep understanding of tribal sovereignty through the localized Indigenous community experiences, including the education, history, governance, and culture of those whose land/territory these institutions occupy. There is a growing urgency (Tuck & Yang, 2012) to ground our educational scholarship and acknowledgements in Indigenous futurities by reexamining the goals of multicultural education, exploring and engaging with our settler colonial truths, and working toward reconciliation. This is particularly important within educational institutions whose history and commitments to multicultural education have voiced solidarity without creating the conditions for collaboration to “reconnect with land, culture and community” (Corntassel, 2012). This presentation examines the complexities and possibilities of honoring tribal sovereignty and Indigenous futurities within our educational institutions.

PK-12 TEACHER WORKSHOP: Not recorded

Interrupting Bias, Challenging Institutional Barriers and Forging a Pedagogy of Place

This workshop will be a practical extension of the keynote address on Friday.  We will focus on the practical pedagogical tools around discussing Indigeneity and engaging in these discussions in ways that invite people into meaningful conversations. This will include strategies for engaging Native communities in the important place based approaches to learning. The session will also include the principles and practices of interrupting personal bias and, equally important, confronting and working to change institutional barriers to equity in classrooms and schools. Participants will develop a plan of action for themselves and their school context.

To introduce our presenters:

Francisco Rios, Ph. D., is a professor of secondary education in the Woodring College of Education at Western Washington University. His research interests include teachers of color, Latinos in education, and preservice teacher education with a multicultural focus. Francisco served as the Senior Associate Editor of Multicultural Perspectives, the Journal of the National Association for Multicultural Education. Francisco serves as President of the National Association for Multicultural Education from November 2014-November 2016.

 Kristen B. French, Ph.D, is currently an associate professor in Elementary Education and director of the Center for Education, Equity and Diversity at Western Washington University. In 2012, Kristen received the Ken Gass Community Building Award for outstanding contributions to children, youth, and families, the WWU’s Women of Color Empowerment Award, and the WWU’s Excellence in Teaching Award. Kristen’s engaged scholarship includes multicultural teacher education, Indigenous education, decolonizing theory and critical performative pedagogy.

Access to the live and archived keynote and faculty development lectures can be found on LiveStream.

April 28th and 29th, 2017:   Dr. Francisco Rios and Dr. Kristen French

Fostering Inclusive Environments for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners”

Education_Rios (3)

Francisco Rios, Ph. D., is Dean of the Woodring College of Education at Western Washington University. His research interests include teachers of color, Latinos in education, and preservice teacher education with a multicultural focus. Francisco served as the Senior Associate Editor of Multicultural Perspectives, the Journal of the National Association for Multicultural Education. Francisco serves as President of the National Association for Multicultural Education from November 2014-November 2016.

 Kristen B. French, Ph.D, is currently an associate professor in Elementary Education and director of the Center for Education, Equity and Diversity at Western Washington University. In 2012, Kristen received the Ken Gass Community Building Award for outstanding contributions to children, youth, and families, the WWU’s Women of Color Empowerment Award, and the WWU’s Excellence in Teaching Award. Kristen’s engaged scholarship includes multicultural teacher education, Indigenous education, decolonizing theory and critical performative pedagogy.

Access to the live and archived keynote and faculty development lectures can be found on LiveStream.

 

November 4th and 5th, 2016 Dr. Gisela Ernst-Slavit

Dr. Ernst-Slavit is professor of education and ELL at Washington State University-Vancouver. She teaches courses in sociolinguistics, literacy and biliteracy, research on second language teaching and learning, ESL methods, and critical issues in the education of Latino students. She investigates language and education in culturally and linguistically diverse settings using ethnographic and sociolinguistic perspectives. She has won multiple awards, has presented at the local, national and international levels, and has a multitude of published works.

Access to the live and archived keynote and faculty development lectures can be found on LiveStream.


  April 29-30, 2016 Dr. Francisco Rios with Special Guest Dr. Kristen French

Education_Rios

Dr. Rios is the dean of Woodring College of Education at Western Washington University.  Rios’ research interests include teachers of color, Latinos in education and pre-service teacher education with Association for Multicultural Education, and is the current president of the National Association for Multicultural Education.

Dr. French is an associate professor in elementary education and director of the Center for Education, Equity and Diversity  at Western Washington University.  Kristen’s engaged scholarship includes multicultural teacher education, indigenous education, decolonizing theory and critical performative pedagogy.

https://www.eou.edu/news-press/cultivating-cultural-responsiveness/

Access to the live and archived keynote and faculty development lectures can be found on LiveStream.


June 18-20, 2015 Summer Institute with 2014-2015 K-12 Participants

The Center for Culturally Responsive Practices will hold its First Annual Summer Institute for area K-12 teachers June 18-June 20, 2015. Dr. Marvin Lynn and Dr. Gisela Ernst-Slavit are the international scholars at this event. The participants from local schools in the region will be staying on campus throughout the event.

Dr. Marvin Lynn

Dr. Marvin Lynn is Professor and Dean of the School of Education at Indiana University South Bend. He is also an internationally recognized expert on race and education. His research examines the work and lives of African American male teachers as well as the impact of teacher beliefs on African American students. He serves as an editorial board member of several journals, and has published more than two-dozen research articles and book chapters in reputable outlets.

 Photos and video archives of Dr. Lynn from the 2015 Summer institute can be viewed here.

Dr. Gisela Ernst-Slavit:  June 2015

Dr. Ernst-Slavit is professor of education and ELL. She teaches courses in sociolinguistics, literacy and biliteracy, research on second language teaching and learning, ESL methods, and critical issues in the education of Latino students. She is a past president of WAESOL (Washington State English to Speakers of Other Languages).
http://education.wsu.edu/directory/faculty/ernstslavitg

Photos and video archives of Dr. Ernst-Slavit from the 2015 Summer institute can be viewed here.

Dr. Richard Milner:  April 2015

Dr. Richard Milner

H. Richard Milner IV(also known as Rich) is the Helen Faison Endowed Chair of Urban Education, Professor of Education, Professor of Sociology (by courtesy), Professor of Social Work (by courtesy), and Professor of Africana Studies (by courtesy) as well as Director of the Center for Urban Education at the University of Pittsburgh. Previously, Professor Milner was Lois Autrey Betts Associate Professor and Associate Professor of Education in the Departments of Teaching and Learning and Leadership, Policy and Organizations (by courtesy) as well as a founding director of the graduate program, Learning, Diversity and Urban Studies at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. At Vanderbilt, in 2008, he became the first Black person to earn promotion and tenure in the entire College of Education’s 225-year history. He is a policy fellow of the National Education Policy Center. His research, teaching and policy interests concern urban education, teacher education, African American literature, and the sociology of education. In particular, Professor Milner’s research examines practices that support teachers for success in urban schools.
Professor Milner’s work has appeared in numerous journals, and he has published five books. His book, published in 2010 by Harvard Education Press, is: Start where you are but don’t stay there: Understanding diversity, opportunity gaps, and teaching in today’s classrooms, which represents years of research and development effort. The book is considered a bestseller. In addition, this book has been recognized with two awards: (1) the 2012 American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education Outstanding Book Award, and (2) a 2011 American Educational Studies Association Critics’ Choice Book Award. His forthcoming book, Rac(e)ing to class: Confronting poverty and race in schools and classrooms will be published in April 2015 by Harvard Education Press.
In 2006, Professor Milner received an Early Career Award from the American Educational Research Association, the world’s largest educational research organization. Over the last two years, Professor Milner has appeared on the top 200 Edu-Scholar Public Presence Ranking, published by Education Week (#95 in 2013, #88 in 2014, and #89 in 2015). His work has appeared in the New York Times, National Education Association Today, and Education Week.
In 2012, Professor Milner was honored with The Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology Distinguished Alumnus Award. Currently, he is Editor-in-chief of Urban Education and co-editor of the Handbook of Urban Education with Kofi Lomotey published with Routledge Press in 2014.
During the summer of 2010, Professor Milner was honored with a Visiting Scholar Fellowship at York University in Toronto, Canada, where he taught in the Language, Literacy, and Culture Program. Also during the summers of 2010, 2011 and 2013, he served as a Visiting Faculty member in the department of Policy and Leadership at the University of Texas-Austin. In 2012, Dr. Milner served as a Visiting Scholar of the Graduate School of Education’s Scholars of Color Symposium Series at the University of Pennsylvania. But most importantly, Professor Milner has been married for almost 10 years and is the proud father of identical three year-old twin daughters, Anna and Elise.

Click here for photos and video archives of Dr. Sleeter’s keynote and workshops, the full keynote and faculty development lecture can be found on LiveStream.

Dr. Christine E Sleeter:  February 2015

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Christine E. Sleeter is Professor Emerita in the College of Professional Studies at California State University Monterey Bay, where she was a founding faculty member. Formerly a high school learning disabilities teacher in Seattle, she previously served as a faculty member at Ripon College in Wisconsin and at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside. She has been a visiting professor or lecturer at several universities, including University of Colorado Boulder, Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, San Francisco State University, University of Washington Seattle, Universidad Nacional de Education a Distancia in Madrid, Spain, and Høgskolen i Oslo og Akershus in Oslo, Norway. Currently she is consultant to a project for teacher education improvement at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso. She is Immediate Past President of the National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME), and previously served as Vice President of Division K (Teaching and Teacher Education) of the American Educational Research Association (AERA). Her research focuses on anti-racist multicultural education and teacher education. Dr. Sleeter has published over 100 articles in journals and edited books, such as Educational Researcher, Multicultural Review, Urban Education, and Teaching and Teacher Education. Her recent books include Diversifying the Teacher Workforce (Routledge, 2014, with L. I. Neal and K. K. Kumashiro), Power, Teaching and Teacher Education (Peter Lang, 2013), Professional Development for Culturally Responsive and Relationship-based Pedagogy (Peter Lang, 2013). Her work has been translated into Spanish, Korean, French, and Portuguese. She has been invited to speak in most U.S. states as well as several countries. Recent awards for her work include the American Educational Research Association Social Justice in Education Award, the Chapman University Paulo Freire Education Project Social Justice Award, the American Educational Research Association Division K Legacy Award, and the American Educational Research Association Special Interest Group on Multicultural and Multiethnic Lifetime Achievement Award. She is currently in the process of completing her first novel, White Bread.  

Click here for photos and video archives of Dr. Sleeter‘s keynote and workshops, the full keynote and faculty development lecture can be found on LiveStream.

Dr. Geneva Gay:  September 2014

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Dr. Geneva Gay is Professor of Education at the University of Washington-Seattle where she teaches multicultural education and general curriculum theory. She is the recipient of the Distinguished Scholar Award, presented by the Committee on the Role and Status of Minorities in Educational Research and Development of the American Educational Research Association; the first Multicultural Educator Award presented by the National Association of Multicultural Education; the 2004 W.E.B. Du Bois Distinguished Lecturer Award presented by the Special Interest Group on Research Focus on Black Education of the American Educational Research Association; and the 2006 Mary Anne Raywid Award for Distinguished Scholarship in the Field of Education, presented by the Society of Professors of Education. She is nationally and internationally known for her scholarship in multicultural education, particularly as it relates to curriculum design, staff development, classroom instruction, and intersections of culture, race, ethnicity, teaching, and learning.

Click here for the photos and video archives of Dr. Gay‘s keynote and workshops.