Program Overview

Anthropology / Sociology Program Overview

Students receiving a BS or BA degree in Anthropology/Sociology will possess the following:

  • A solid foundation in the core academic disciplines of anthropology and sociology
  • A basic understanding of fundamental concepts in anthropology and sociology
  • A basic understanding of cross-cultural and intracultural perspectives
  • Ability to examine key issues affecting contemporary societies through the social science lenses of anthropology and sociology
  • Effective skills in critical thinking and discourse within the disciplines
  • Effective skills in analytical and reflective writing, and other types of appropriate writing
  • An ability to function effectively in small group work settings
  • Basic statistical and literacy skills
  • General computer literacy

Learning outcomes

Students receiving a BS or BA degree in Anthropology/Sociology will be able to demonstrate the following:

  1. Communication: Demonstrate a solid understanding of core concepts in anthropology and sociology through effective communication, including scholarly writing and public presentations.
  2. Inquiry: Demonstrate and apply cross-cultural perspectives, rooted in inquiry-based knowledge, in the analysis of social, economic, and political issues.
  3. Critical Thinking: Demonstrate effective skills in critical thinking, analytical and reflective writing, and appropriate discourse within the core disciplines.
  4. Civic Engagement: Identify, analyze, and address real world problems through scholarly and structured civic engagement.
  5. Integrated Learning: Learning involves making connections between one are or concept and another, or from one level to another.

Means of assessment

  • Successful completion of required and elective course work (appropriate for each concentration), with at least a C- in every graded course counted toward the major, and a 2.00 GPA for all courses counted toward the major.
  • Successful completion of the University Writing Requirement, in addition to writing-intensive courses in the major.
  • Successful completion of a statistics course utilizing computers and of writing projects requiring the use of computer and word processing, demonstrating computer literacy.
  • Successful completion of an appropriate senior paper, project, or practicum within one of the three concentrations, demonstrating the ability to research, practice, and/or analyze various topics within anthropology and/or sociology.
  • Successful completion of the ANTH/SOC Senior Seminar demonstrating an understanding of anthropological and sociological concepts, and the ability to display and apply this understanding in a public setting of one’s peers.

To ensure that students meet the above program outcomes, they demonstrate proficiency by means of the following (depending on the course): research papers, essays, in-class exams (essays, short answers, objective questions), take-home exams, map quizzes, group projects, individual and group presentations, library skills assignments, critical autobiographies and oral histories, production and analysis of surveys, development of formal research proposals, ethnographic observations and field-based research, reaction papers, summaries/ analysis papers based on readings, quizzes, formal debates, book reviews, literature reviews, and class participation and preparedness. Each assignment is assessed by means of specific evaluative criteria.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Anthropology/Sociology

A “C-” grade or better is required in all graded Anthropology and Sociology courses that are used to meet program requirements. A 2.00 GPA or better in all transcripted Anthropology or Sociology courses, including both transferred courses and those taken at Eastern, is required for good standing within the program.

Students in all concentrations will be required to take a college-level statistics course of at least 4 credits with a grade of C- or better. Students must also complete a mathematics course at the 100-level or above, with a grade of “C-” or better. Each student must demonstrate computer literacy in a way appropriate to his or her individual plans and approved by the student’s adviser.

Anthropology program

For a concentration in Anthropology, students must complete Eastern graduation requirements, and at least 65 hours in Anthropology/Sociology to include:

  • ANTH 203 Cultural Anthropology (5), and
  • ANTH 220 Physical Anthropology (5)
  • At least 35 upper division hours in Anthropology are required, including: ANTH 356 Language & Culture (5), ANTH 360 Intro to Archaeology & Prehistory (5), ANTH 454 Anthropological History & Theory (5), and either ANTH 391 Applied Ethnographic Research (5) or ANTH 395 Archaeological Research Methods (5).
  • ANTH 499 Senior Seminar (1)
  • A 5 credit faculty-approved capstone such as: ANTH 401 Research and/or ANTH 405 Reading and Conference and/or ANTH 409 Practicum.
  • An additional 9 upper division elective credits in Anthropology to reach the minimum 35 credits.
  • At least 20 hours in Sociology, including SOC 204 or SOC 205.

Total credit hours: 65

Sociology programs

Offering a concentration in Sociology / Social Welfare, students must complete Eastern graduation requirements and at least 65 hours in Anthropology/Sociology to include:

  • SOC 204 Gen Soc Introduction, and
  • SOC 205 Gen Soc: Problems
  • At least 20 hours in Anthropology, including either ANTH 100 or ANTH 203 Cultural Anthropology
  • At least 35 upper division hours in Sociology including: SOC 315 (Introduction to Social Welfare), SOC 327 (Introduction to Social Research) and SOC 454 (Sociological Theory)
  • SOC 499 Senior Seminar (this 1 credit course counts in the 35 upper division hour requirement.)
  • Senior Capstone project (Soc 403, two variations each with a practical and research component, with varying emphases depending on whether it is Sociology (research emphasized in applied setting) or Social Welfare (applied setting emphasized with research component)
  • The additional requirements for the concentration:
    • Sociology emphasis: Students must complete a minimum of five credit hours in:  SOC 455 Practice of Social Research (3); and SOC 403 Senior Capstone (5); or, with consent of faculty adviser, SOC 401 Research (minimum 5 credits).  These courses count in the 35 upper-division credit hours requirement.
    • Social Welfare emphasis: Students must complete:  SOC 315 (Foundations of Social Welfare, now a requirement for the program), SOC 420 Social Welfare Practices, SOC 403 (Social Welfare Senior Capstone, requiring a minimum of five credit hours (or the equivalent experience) in a pre-professional setting with a social welfare/public services provider in the area). These courses count in the 35 upper-division credit hours requirement.

Total credit hours 65

Typical first year curriculum

Fall

  • ANTH 100 Intro to Anthropology (5)
  • General Education or Elective Courses (10)

Winter

  • ANTH 201, 202 or 203 (Cultural, Biological Anthropology or Archaeology) (5)
  • General Education or Elective Courses (10)

Spring

  • General Education or Elective Courses (15)

Typical second year curriculum

Fall

  • SOC 204 General Sociology Introduction (5) or
  • SOC 205 General Sociology Problems (5)
  • General Education or Elective Courses (10)

Winter

  • ANTH 201, 202 or 203 (Cultural, Biological Anthropology or Archaeology) (5)
  • SOC 205 (Soc. problems) or 204 (General Sociology)
  • General Education or Elective Courses (5)

Spring

  • ANTH upper division (5)
  • SOC 204 or 205 (offered alternate terms, 5 cr)
  • General Education or Elective Courses (5)

NOTE: 100 and 200 level courses in Anthropology and Sociology may be taken whenever offered in the freshman or sophomore years. These courses need not be taken in order, for example, SOC 205 may be taken before or after SOC 204.

Typical third year curriculum

Select courses from the following, depending upon program concentration:

Fall

  • SOC 315 Foundations of Social Welfare (5)
  • SOC 454 Sociological Theory (5) or
  • ANTH upper division (300 or higher) (5)

Winter

  • SOC 327 Introduction to Social Research (5)
  • ANTH 356 or other upper division (5) or
  • SOC upper division (5)

Spring

  • SOC or ANTH upper division (5-10)
  • ANTH 454 Anthropology History & Theory (5)

Typical fourth year curriculum

Select courses from the following, depending upon program concentration:

Fall

  • SOC 401 Research (5) or
  • SOC 455 The Practice of Social Research (3)
  • SOC 454 Sociological Theory (Junior or Senior yr) (5)
  • ANTH or SOC upper division (5)
  • ANTH or SOC 499 (Senior Seminar, only Fall term) (1)

Winter

  • ANTH 454 Anthropology History & Theory (Junior or senior yr) (5)
  • SOC 420 Social Welfare Practices (5)
  • SOC 403 (Applied capstone in Sociology) (5)
  • SOC 456 Social Research Analysis(2)
  • ANTH 407 Senior Capstone project (5)

Spring

  • ANTH or SOC upper division electives (5)
  • SOC 403 Capstone (5)
  • Elective Courses as needed to reach 60 upper division

NOTE: 300 and 400 level courses in Anthropology and Sociology may be taken whenever offered in junior or senior years. A total of 35 upper-division hours are required for the Anthropology, Sociology, and Sociology/Social Welfare concentrations. For further advice on related topics such as General Education, University Writing Requirement or the Diversity Requirement, see the University’s Advising Page or the Anth/Soc Advising page.

Minor in Anthropology/Sociology

This minor is also available via through on-line/on-site courses.

Download checksheet and Recognition of Minor application

A minimum of 30 graded credits at the “C-” level or better in Anthropology and Sociology. Student must maintain a “C” (2.00) or better cumulative GPA in courses required for the major.

The above must include:
a. At least 10 graded credits in each of the two disciplines.
b. At least 20 graded credits in upper division.
A minimum of 10 hours counting toward the minor must be completed at Eastern Oregon University.

NOTE: It is recommended that a senior year integrating project be included in each minor. That project might, for example, be a paper completed as part of the regular requirements of an Anthropology or Sociology course but focusing upon some topic related to the student’s major.

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