Course Offerings

Communication Studies Course Descriptions

COM 110 – Selected Topics (Credits: 1 to 6)
An in-depth presentation of a topic of interest to both students and faculty. Topics will vary from year to year depending on the interests and availability of faculty. Prerequisites: May be required for some topics.

COM 111 – Interpersonal Com*GTW (Credits: 3)
Gen Ed Core-Gateway

A games and theory approach to communication between individuals and in small groups. Emphasis is on meaningful interaction with employment of theory as needed.

COM 112 – Public Speaking*GTW (Credits: 3)
Gen Ed Core-Gateway

Theory of and practice in techniques of informing and presenting information to an audience, emphasizing the use of visual aids. Topics include informative, persuasive, extemporaneous and group speeches.

COM 210 – Selected Topics (Credits: 1 to 6)
An in-depth presentation of a topic of interest to both students and faculty. Topics will vary from year to year depending on the interests and availability of faculty. Prerequisites: May be required for some topics.

COM 211 – Small Group Communication (Credits: 3)
This course introduces small group dynamics and democratic decision-making in small group process. Students learn to articulate ideas, resolve conflict, take leadership, respect diversity, and sustain group cohesiveness.

COM 214 – Oral Interpretation*APC (Credits: 3)
Gen Ed Core-Artistic Process & Creation

Introduces basic physical and vocal performance techniques used in presentations that may include short stories, essays, poetry and theatre. All performance works will be script-in-hand. No exact memorization is expected.

COM 215 – Conflict Management*AEH (Credits: 3)
Gen Ed Core-Aesthetics & Humanities

This course will analyze and apply conflict management concepts, principles, strategies, and techniques to our daily lives. This is done in order to foster a happier, healthier work, home and community environment for ourselves, our families, friends, and associates.

COM 232 – Group Discussion (Credits: 3)
This course introduces small group dynamics and democratic decision-making in a small group process. Students learn to articulate ideas, resolve conflicts, take leadership, respect diversity, and sustain group cohesiveness.

COM 235 – Nonverbal Communication (Credits: 3)
This course provides students with the ability to observe, describe, and interpret, nonverbal behaviors accurately. Students also increase their ability to manage their own nonverbal behaviors effectively for a desired outcome. Prerequisites: None. An interpersonal communication course is suggested.

COM 250 – Communication & Society (Credits: 3)
This course surveys the dialectical relationships between communication behavior and the quality of human affairs at interpersonal, small group, organizational, national, and global levels, with emphasis on how individual perception, cognition, and identity interact with societal power in various communication contexts/genres. Major concepts/theories such as self-esteem, stereotype threats, cognitive representation, political incorrectness, cultivation, hegemony, and pseudoanonymity will be discussed.

COM 260 – Foundations of Mass Media (Credits: 4)
This course adopts a critical/cultural approach to survey the relationship between communication innovations and human affairs at large. Specifically, this course examines the evolution of media technology in the United States and its impact on the ethos of national culture. Major issues such as media representation, media consumption, media acculturation, and media consolidation will be discussed.

COM 310 – Selected Topics (Credits: 1 to 6)
An in-depth presentation of a topic of interest to both students and faculty. Topics will vary from year to year depending on the interests and availability of faculty. Prerequisites: May be required for some topics. Students must have at least a Sophomore standing to register for this course.

COM 319 – Leadership Communication (Credits: 2)
This course introduces and guides students to explore the correlation between excellent communication and effective leadership/management strategies. Students learn different perspectives in regard to leadership as a positive influence to help an organization to achieve its goals. Topics such as power, credibility, motivation, and leadership traits/styles are explored. Students learn practical skill to make themselves a positive influence in various organizational settings.

COM 320 – Speaking in Modern Org*AEH (Credits: 3)
Gen Ed Core-Aesthetics & Humanities

Students develop speaking skills shown to assist them most in daily on the job situations. Prerequisite: College level public speaking course, equivalent, or consent of instructor. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.

COM 325 – Intercultural Communication*AEH (Credits: 2)
Gen Ed Core-Aesthetics & Humanities
Institutional grad requirement – DPD

This course examines how communication behavior differs among cultures in various contexts such as workplace, school, healthcare, and diplomacy. Students learn to be adaptive different worldviews, meaning system, stereotypes, and ethnocentric behavior. Major issues such as identity, ethnocentrism, and multiculturalism will be discussed. Prerequisite: Must have at least junior standing to register for this course.

COM 330 – Are You Listening*AEH (Credits: 3)
Gen Ed Core-Aesthetics & Humanities

This course provides students with the theoretical foundation and the practical skills to examine and alter their ability to listen within the personal and professional setting. Prerequisite: None. COM 111 recommended. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.

COM 335 – Com, Gender & Culture*AEH (Credits: 2)
Gen Ed Core-Aesthetics & Humanities
Institutional grad requirement – DPD

The goal of this course is for students to increase their understanding of women and men in the communication process and to implement diverse communication styles as they relate to gendered communication. Placing communication in context, this class will glean knowledge from history and anthropology of cultures built by men and women around the world. Exploring how communication, gender and culture interweave to influence perceptions and create expectations of gender roles, we ask how social “progress” has affected gender and the way we communicate. Students will be compelled to set a new vision for women and men living in a global community. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.

COM 340 – Interviewing Strategies *AEH (Credits: 3)
Gen Ed Core-Aesthetics & Humanities

Students examine communication theory, design, and use practical interviewing skills required to gain accurate information in a variety of settings. Ethical and legal aspects of interviewing people are emphasized. Interview types include survey, employee selection, probing, counseling, healthcare, and media. Students master interview competencies intended for careers in fire services, management, health care, education, media, or anyone interested in gaining accurate information.

COM 345 – Advertising Principles & Practice (Credits: 4)
This course introduces the concepts, history, theories, legal/ethical issues, and routine practices of advertising as a medium of information in modern society. Students learn how advertising meshes with the ethos of our national culture, how advertising works in the market economy, how advertising appeals to consumers, and how to create selling ad copy.

COM 347 – Com at End Of Life*AEH (Credits: 2)
Gen Ed Core-Aesthetics & Humanities

This class emphasizes the interpersonal and intercultural communication skills necessary for relating to others in the situation of death. One of the most essential things in life is to establish an unafraid, heartfelt communication with others, and it is never more important than with a dying person. Those who are dying often speak in symbolic language, recognizing this symbolism may enable us to reassure and better understand death as the last stage in our growth. Student must have at least sophomore standing to register for this course.

COM 350 – Public Relations Principles & Practice (Credits: 4)
Institutional grad requirement – UWR

This course introduces basic concepts, theories, issues, and routine practices of public relations as a communication profession in the contemporary world. It examines how organizations as well as individuals can ethically and scientifically build productive, mutually beneficial relationships with various stakeholders and the general public through effective communication.

COM 360 – Media Theory (Credits: 4)
Institutional grad requirement – UWR

This course adopts the “big picture” approach to explore the elements of media process such as regulation, production, representation, and consumption. With this approach, students get a better understanding of the relationship between media and society, especially the relationships between media and ideology, media representation and social inequality, and media ownership and political power. Furthermore, students develop skills in ideological analysis of media content. Prerequisites: COM 260 Foundations of Mass Media.

COM 385 – Communication Law (Credits: 3)
This course explains legal problems, such as libel, copyright infringement, privacy violation, obscenity, deception, and prejudicial publicity, etc., in public communication. Students learn to apply the First Amendment principle to mass mediated communication and how to navigate through legal questions in the context of professional communication.

COM 395 – Communication Ethics (Credits: 3)
This course introduces moral philosophy and ethical reasoning for students of mass media communication. Students learn to appreciate the moral foundation of media law and the principle of social responsibility required of free media. More important, they learn to weigh competing principles and values to render a decision with a degree of moral certainty. Important ethical issues such as truthfulness and honesty, privacy, confidentiality, conflict of interest, editorial independence, indecency, and stereotypes will be discussed.

COM 409 – Practicum/Internship (Credits: 2)
This course requires students to apply their knowledge and skills in communication to their future jobs related to communication, such as news writing, broadcasting, public relations, advertising, human resources, education, business communication, and so on. Students are advised by faculty and field supervisors to engage in communication activities or communication research. Must have senior standing to register for this course.

COM 499 – Capstone (Credits: 3)
This course guides students to complete a rigorous research project in Communication Studies. Students are required to recapitulate their learning of the subject matter and to reflect on the important issues in human communication. Critical thinking and dialectical approach are strongly recommended in this research project. Students are expected to present their studies in local or regional/national conference. Prerequisites: COM 409 Practicum/Internship.